Next stop: Dreamhost.

We were lucky. Club Troppo failed on a weekend, when it has far fewer visitors. Had it failed on a weekday it probably would have upset a lot of you out there in reader-land.

As I outlined in my previous Site News, the root cause of the outage was that Club Troppo ran out of disk space on our current host. Once this became apparent I was able to fix the problem and the site has continued on its merry way.

Ken asked me to recommend another host. He noticed that Catallaxy has moved to the well-regarded Blue Host and that I had previously recommended a move to Dreamhost, another well-regarded outfit. In the end he chose Dreamhost, mostly on the basis that yours truly – who seems to have turned into Club Troppo’s Mr Fixit – is familiar and comfortable with Dreamhost.

The important point is this: Club Troppo will be moving to Dreamhost, hopefully this coming weekend 27-28 January. There may be some disruption to service, and some comments may be lost during the period. I’ll post an announcement when we start the move, and another when it is finished.

Once we’ve moved to Dreamhost, Club Troppo will have essentially unlimited room to grow, and I don’t expect to see the weekend’s problems recurring again.

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7 Responses to Next stop: Dreamhost.

  1. For my business needs I’ve picked up a few Site5 deals. Painless and reliable so far.

    I’m running a trial blog site on a couple just to fool around with various FLOSS blogg tools – also free and supplied with one click install on site5. Has IMAP email, unlimited – yes unlimited email accounts, subdomains and 5TB transfer with 55GB storage, and photo album programs plus all the usual admin panels etc plus backups all inclusive for usa$5 per month.

    Better than crappy oz hosting deals I used to use.

    site5 here

  2. Jacques Chester says:

    FXH;

    Yeah, a lot of the US/international webhosts offer much better deal than our locals. It’s as if Australian hosts haven’t realised that they compete in a totally globalised market.

    Dreamhost offers similar plans and a pretty good track record, plus as I said I am familar with the services they offer. I should probably also mention before anyone accuses me of it that I had an interest in the decision: I advised Ken that I’d receive a cash bonus from Dreamhost if he named me as the referer, but he still decided to go with it.

  3. D W Griffiths says:

    Dreamhost is a terrific host and a terrific choice. Well done.

  4. Tim says:

    For what it’s worth, I had big problems with DreamHost and found their support somewhat lacking. I wouldn’t slag them off entirely, but I’ve since done better.

  5. Jacques Chester says:

    As I said to Ken, there are a lot of critics of Dreamhost, people who felt that they didn’t get good value. On the other hand they host 400,000 sites, so the odds are pretty much solid that there would be hundreds of dissatisfied customers if even 0.5% were unhappy.

    My experience is the same as D W Griffth’s: that they are a fine hosting outfit.

  6. Caz says:

    Everyone’s moving to Dreamhost. We’re taking TSSH over there next month when our current hosting package expires. Our host at the moment promises 99.9 per cent up time but we’re not even online for 99.9 per cent of each day currently.

    I’ve read some accounts about Dreamhost’s support that aren’t very favourable – possibly in keeping with what Tim alludes to above. But I figure it’s worth a shot. They have a 97 day money back guarantee if you aren’t happy with them. And amazingly let you have TERRABYTES of bandwidth transfer per month. It seems a bit too good to be true, but we’ll all see sooner than later I guess.

  7. D W Griffiths says:

    As far as I can divine, Dreamhost offers the value it does because they automate everything in sight. They use a set-up they built themselves. They appear to be grade-A Unix geeks, so the way they automate will make sense to anyone familiar with the Unix world. They may be less satisfactory for people who are used to an IT world where the user is protected from the underlying mechanics.

    They have always seemed to me very good at email-based support, although my needs have been limited. I suspect their phone support may be less slick.

    In short, they’re the service for people who live on the Web.

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