Author Archives: Nicholas Gruen

Forecasting and competition policy

Values are observed in actions and choices, and rather less so in words. Competition policy has been applied with great relish to the labour market – at least at the bottom end. (Subject to our relatively generous basic and award wage … Continue reading

Posted in Competitions, Cultural Critique, Economics and public policy, Innovation, Politics - national | 3 Comments

Brian Schmidt: The Mathematics Does Not Lie: Why Polling Got The Australian Election Wrong

This is a guest post by Brian Schmidt. Actually it isn’t, I’ve cut and pasted. I hope he doesn’t mind. Important stuff. HT: John Walker Everyone in my office grew sick last week of my continual complaints about the state … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Economics and public policy, Politics - national | 51 Comments

RIP Bob Hawke: a repost from 2008

I worked for the early Hawke government in 1983 and 1984 when I worked for Senator John Button. Hawke barely knew me then or later, but in 2003, I attended a dinner at Moonee Valley Racecourse in honour of the … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Economics and public policy, Political theory, Politics - national | 5 Comments

Guest Post by Peter Dempster: A novel voting strategy for centrists

Peter Dempster asked me to post this follow-up post to an earlier one of his. Nicholas A novel voting strategy for centrists Vote 1 for your preferred party but then do something very unusual – Vote 2 for the opposing party, … Continue reading

Posted in Political theory, Politics - national | 3 Comments

History and economics: it was all there in the beginning …

<SelfIndulgenceAlert>Stuart MacIntyre was kind enough to suggest me as a discussant on a paper on financial deregulation in the 1980s in a workshop focusing on Australia and the Bretton Woods conference put on by Melbourne Uni History and Economic History. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments

Adam Smith was a feminist economist: Care – the essay

This recent essay in the Mandarin is a reworking of an essay I wrote in 2016 in a string of essays in which I developed the idea of the Evaluator General. I was following Gary Sturgess’ suggestion that governments should not think of themselves as producing … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural Critique, Economics and public policy, Health, History, Parenting | 3 Comments

War on empathy, war on confidence, war on context

Cross posted with the Mandarin Nicholas Gruen has argued that it’s much harder to realise evidence-based policy – both institutionally and intellectually – than many calling for it realise. Here he explains how putatively ‘scientific’ and ‘objective’ approaches can, paradoxically, compromise their efficacy … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 16 Comments