Category Archives: Democracy

The Future of Politics: by John Burnheim

Politics is about constructing those public goods that are necessary for communities, are a minimum to deal with problems that threaten life itself. In our present situation, the most serious problems are all posed on a global scale, as a … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Philosophy, Political theory, Sortition and citizens’ juries | Leave a comment

Citizens’ chambers: towards an activism of selection by lot

In a recent paper, James Fishkin identifies some potential shortcomings of citizen’s chambers which justify his own preference for ad hoc, and temporary citizens’ panels. I think he makes some good points. I think his arguments need further exploration which I … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 3 Comments

Arise Nicholas Gruen: Economic Rockstar

Yes, it is a little over the top isn’t it? Anyway, here’s Frank’s interview with me last Friday night.

Posted in Democracy, Economics and public policy | 1 Comment

Authoritarianism: GUEST POST by John Burnheim

Arguing with an American ex-Australian now resident in Canada, I contested his view that, of the three countries, America is the least and Australia the most, authoritarian. In part it was a verbal difference. I was taking “authoritarian” in the … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural Critique, Democracy, Philosophy, Political theory, Politics - international | 25 Comments

The people’s voice: as rage and as healing

There’s a spectre haunting Europe … and the rest of the Western world. We have elaborate ‘diversity’ programs in good upper-middle-class places to prevent discrimination against all manner of minorities (and majorities like women). It’s a fine thing. But there’s a … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural Critique, Democracy, Philosophy, Political theory, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 23 Comments

Centrist strategic voting

This is my response to Peter Dempster’s proposals. I can see one important merit of them. Electoral politics is inherently polarising because electoral politics involves politicians beating other politicians to qualify to be politicians in the first place – by getting into … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Political theory, Politics - international, Politics - national | 27 Comments

The Rise of China and dealing with American grief.

Like the world today, Europe in the 19th century witnessed major shifts in the balance of power, with new technologies changing how life was lived. Otto von Bismarck, a Prussian, saw opportunities in that chaos. He unified the warring German … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural Critique, Democracy, Economics and public policy, Geeky Musings, History, Life, Political theory, Politics - international, Social Policy, Society | 25 Comments