Budget-free zone

What I don’t know about economics would fill a library. Moreover, the mainstream media is full of budget analysis and comment, as are some other blogs. So I think I’ll give it a miss, except for these shoot-from-the-lip glib oversimplifications. The tax cuts (despite the skew to high income earners – or maybe because of them – the aspirational middle class certainly aspire to earning 125 grand a year) are undoubtedly smart politics unless they trigger another RBA interest rate rise, and the measures to push single parents, older unemployed and disability support pension recipients back into the workforce will also play well with most of the punters if not the chattering classes (I’ve decided to alternate the RWDB pejorative labels – I’ll probably use “politically correct brigade” and “latte sippers” in the comment box). You can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs.

Unless the international economy turns very nasty, Beazley looks certain to be a three time loser. But a week is a long time in politics, and it’s always darkest before the dawn. I aspire to posting wholly in cliches. At the end of the day I think it may be my core competency, so going forward it looks like a win-win, customer-centric situation with some major value-adding for the c-d demographic blog reader target market.

About Ken Parish

Ken Parish is a legal academic, with research areas in public law (constitutional and administrative law), civil procedure and teaching & learning theory and practice. He has been a legal academic for almost 20 years. Before that he ran a legal practice in Darwin for 15 years and was a Member of the NT Legislative Assembly for almost 4 years in the early 1990s.
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David Tiley
2022 years ago

It’s always darkest before the dawn, so the big men may yet fly but then the light at the end of the tunnel is probably an approaching train. Never forget it ain’t over till the fat man sings.

jen
jen
2022 years ago

to the most boring man alive.

“I aspire to posting wholly in cliches.”

can’t say I notice much difference – maybe ‘customer centric’ is a little atypical of your normal thought/speech patterns. Damned investigative of you. Is it not client-centric? or are we making up our own cliches or using obscure ones therby subverting the entire concept.

Radical ‘most boring man alive’

I’ve always said your dexterity with the cliche is one of your most endearing features.

Homer Paxton
Homer Paxton
2022 years ago

Ken, cliches are a dime a dozen

wmmbb
2022 years ago

Played strong, did good, Ken.

Robert Merkel
2022 years ago

Easy, Ken, with the cliches. Take it one post at a time…

Jacques Chester
Jacques Chester
2022 years ago

Have you thought of a career as a business consultant, or a very small shell script?
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?BuzzwordBingo

Mark Bahnisch
2022 years ago

While recognising that this post is a tad flippant, I demur, Ken, from you adoption of the Brissenden line that this spells doom for the Beazer – it ain’t over til the fat lady sings!

P.M.Lawrence
2022 years ago

You forgot “avoid cliches like the plague”.

Ken Parish
Ken Parish
2022 years ago

Mark

I’m not sure how much clearer I could have made myself than using the good old cliche “a week is a long time in politics”. Obviously you can’t say sensibly that Beazley is dead in the water in any long term sense (mind you, I frankly don’t understand the thinking behind promising to block the budget tax cuts). People generally forget about tax cuts quite quickly and entirely justifiably, as inflation (and perhaps interest rate rises) eats them up. I agree that the Brissenden line was fatuous, and in fact it was precisely that reaction I was sending up (however ineptly).

Rex
Rex
2022 years ago

Now don’t you go being flippant Ken. That just won’t do.