Nietzsche in a Nutshell: A blast of a passage

I mentioned to someone over a drink tonight that ‘favourite passages’ would be a good blog topic. Here’s one of my favourite pieces of philosophical writing. Feel free to quote one of yours in the comments sections.

It’s the beginning of an early fragment – On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense

In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented knowledge. That was the highest and most mendacious minute of “world history”¢â¬âyet only a minute. After nature had drawn a few breaths the star grew cold, and the clever animals had to die.

One might invent such a fable and still not have illustrated sufficiently how wretched, how shadowy and flighty, how aimless and arbitrary, the human intellect appears in nature. There have been eternities when it did not exist; and when it is done for again, nothing will have happened. For this intellect has no further mission that would lead beyond human life. It is human, rather, and only its owner and producer gives it such importance, as if the world pivoted around it. But if we could communicate with the mosquito, then we would learn that he floats through the air with the same self-importance, feeling within itself the flying center of the world. There is nothing in nature so despicable or insignificant that it cannot immediately be blown up like a bag by a slight breath of this power of knowledge; and just as every porter wants an admirer, the proudest human being, the philosopher, thinks that he sees on the eyes of the universe telescopically focused from all sides on his actions and thoughts.

It is strange that this should be the effect of the intellect, for after all it was given only as an aid to the most unfortunate, most delicate, most evanescent beings in order to hold them for a minute in existence, from which otherwise, without this gift, they would have every reason to flee as quickly as Lessing’s son. [In a famous letter to Johann Joachim Eschenburg (December 31, 1778), Lessing relates the death of his infant son, who “understood the world so well that he left it at the first opportunity.”] That haughtiness which goes with knowledge and feeling, which shrouds the eyes and senses of man in a blinding fog, therefore deceives him about the value of existence by carrying in itself the most flattering evaluation of knowledge itself. Its most universal effect is deception; but even its most particular effects have something of the same character.

The intellect, as a means for the preservation of the individual, unfolds its chief powers in simulation; for this is the means by which the weaker, less robust individuals preserve themselves, since they are denied the chance of waging the struggle for existence with horns or the fangs of beasts of prey. In man this art of simulation reaches its peak: here deception, flattering, lying and cheating, talking behind the back, posing, living in borrowed splendor, being masked, the disguise of convention, acting a role before others and before oneself¢â¬âin short, the constant fluttering around the single flame of vanity is so much the rule and the law that almost nothing is more incomprehensible than how an honest and pure urge for truth could make its appearance among men. They are deeply immersed in illusions and dream images; their eye glides only over the surface of things and sees “forms”; their feeling nowhere lead into truth, but contents itself with the reception of stimuli, playing, as it were, a game of blindman’s buff on the backs of things. Moreover, man permits himself to be lied to at night, his life long, when he dreams, and his moral sense never even tries to prevent this¢â¬âalthough men have been said to have overcome snoring by sheer will power.

What, indeed, does man know of himself! Can he even once perceive himself completely, laid out as if in an illuminated glass case? Does not nature keep much the most from him, even about his body, to spellbind and confine him in a proud, deceptive consciousness, far from the coils of the intestines, the quick current of the blood stream, and the involved tremors of the fibers? She threw away the key; and woe to the calamitous curiosity which might peer just once through a crack in the chamber of consciousness and look down, and sense that man rests upon the merciless, the greedy, the insatiable, the murderous, in the indifference of his ignorance¢â¬âhanging in dreams, as it were, upon the back of a tiger. In view of this, whence in all the world comes the urge for truth?

Click here to read on if you wish.

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John
John
15 years ago

I much prefer this essay titled The Unique Potential of Man at:

1. http://www.dabase.net/unique.htm

John

Gaby
Gaby
15 years ago

On Bishop Berkeley’s idealism.

There once was a man who said, “God
Must think it exceedingly odd

If He finds that this tree
Continues to be

When there’s no one about in the Quad.”

Mark Bahnisch
15 years ago

What, indeed, does man know of himself! Can he even once perceive himself completely, laid out as if in an illuminated glass case?

Bit of a dig at old Rene Descartes there!

There’s another one in the extract but I’ll leave it to philosophically inclined readers to pick up – or as a puzzle for Dan Brown fans to wean themselves off the Da Vinci Code!

Louise
Louise
15 years ago

Row. row, row your boat gently down the stream…
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily; life is but a dream!