The Australian Chess Championship – watch it like you were there!

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I took Alexander (my son) to the Australian Chess Championships being held in Canberra the other day. There on the top boards were four Grandmasters playing (I think Australia only has two – and both were there – Ian Rogers and Darryl Johansen.)

Now I wouldn’t be telling Troppodillians about this because I know (sob, sob) that very few are interested in it. But what took my eye, and why I’m telling Troppodillians about it is that attached to the top four boards were clever little wires leading back to a computer. Your Troppo correspondent could tell immediately that something was up!

And so it was. The internet was spreading its tendrils yet further into our lives. As each player played his (yes his – so far only men have made it onto the top four boards – though there are a couple of women in the event) move, a microchip inside the piece he moved told the board, which then told the cable attached to the board, which then told the computer to which it was attached, when then told the internet.

So literally as the player makes a move on any of the top boards, you can see it here. I guess it’s all obvious, but I wouldn’t have expected it for Australian games (which are not exactly leading the world). But there you go, it’s not expensive to do, so they’re doing it!

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3 Responses to The Australian Chess Championship – watch it like you were there!

  1. blubbie says:

    Here’s another thing you would not expect: playing chess while reading the Australian news. All in one page!

    Free Blubbie Chess Server – Australian version

    Your son might like to solve a chess problem every day to prepare for the Australian Chess Championships in a few decades.

    Greetz,
    blubbie

    ps. or wait: that’s “Cheers mate” in Ozzy language if I remember right from the Croc Dundee movies. LOL

  2. Robert says:

    That is fabulous, Nicholas. You can rewind the game back to the start, and click the way through at your own pace to follow the moves. The only frustrating thing seems to be that you can’t click ahead to see what a player will do next. Then again, the internet is only young. Well found!

    Here’s a New Years cheers to Troppo as well, from a thankful reader. Gets my best blog vote by a long way: terrific posts, which are placed there not by a hurried need to get something on site, but because there was genuine merit in the post. It’s that different focus of need which comes across very clearly, and is appreciated here, whereas at other popular sites an urgency can be quite offputting. And there doesn’t appear that need to post with intent to outsmart. Beaut also to see Troppo’s attempts at promoting are made through creative efforts – excellent efforts; rather than false crappy comments attempting to justify a link to “here’s my take”. Can’t say how wonderful it is also to see proper spellings of the word “the” – heartening, in the proper use of that word, too. All very simple stuff, but very welcome from a reader’s point of view. Comments arrive here not as chatroom, and not as though listening through headphones to commenters gathering on a runway before take off. It’s not a sickly colour, and there’s not a totally useless pain in the arse mouse pointer curler thing continually distracting from what is there. Basically, it’s less manic; it properly understands the value of “serving the reader”, doesn’t try to outdo, is mature and good fun.

    For the bugger all of what it’s worth, I think it sets the standard.

    Congratulations Troppo and have a good one.

  3. Chris Lloyd says:

    Great technology but what a dull game! I haven’t played chess serioudly for 20 years but I still recognise a stock standard Sicilian defence when I see one. Draw agreed at move 17 after nothing has happened bar a bishop swap. Why didn’t they just take the draw at move 1!?

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