Missing Link Daily

A digest of the best of the blogosphere published each weekday and compiled by Ken Parish, James Farrell, Gilmae, Darlene Taylor and Saint.

Politics

Australian

Gummo Trotsky’s Word of the Day (Expression of the Day?) is ex gratia , as in the ex gratia payments to carers that the Government is supposedly callously eliminating.

On the related subject of irritating catchphrases, Pavlov’s Cat may not be the only person who is fed up with Rudd and his ‘working families’, but with her it’s getting personal:

As a six-days-a-week-of-merciless-slogging childless divorcee with one Aged Parent, one only slightly less aged step-parent, two sisters, two unofficial godchildren, two cats, three step-siblings and nine step-nieces and nephews, which while making for a full and interesting life probably doesn’t really constitute a ‘family’ in the politically expedient definition of that word, I would like to express my irritation at being so constantly left out of the Prime Minister’s rhetoric, as, presumably, of his consideration.

But once we get rid of working families, PC, could we consider phasing out ‘hit the ground running’?

Possum Comitatus presents The Pollercoaster ((it’s a cute idea I suppose, except that the ups and downs of the rollercoaster don’t seem to relate in any way to the poll movements.  Still, what else does a psephological blogger do during a post-election honeymoon period when no-one gives a shit about the polls? ~ KP)).

International

Apropos of the Democrats’ stand-off: John Quiggin notes that dead heats in democracies put a particular strain on democratic processes, indicating the need for more intelligent institutional design; while Kimberella laments that intelligent and reflective comments are now and forevermore doomed to be reported only as ‘gaffes‘.

Well, Instapundit might not have made the top 50 most influential blog list, but he’s influenced us to post the totally unsubtle but arguably funny satirical YouTube at right about Clinton campaign racial dogwhistling on Obama.

Every blogger and her dog have posted about the Spitzer scandal (NY Governor resigns after getting busted hiring an expensive hooker).  One of the more interesting slants is from legal academic Jack Balkin who focuses on the wider implications of the role of Spitzer’s bank which dobbed him in:

These events offer a window into a much larger phenomenon, the National Surveillance State, in which the state increasingly identifies and solves problems of governance through the collection, collation and analysis of information. Governments have always used information, but today’s techniques are made more powerful and more prevalent by lower costs of computing and data storage. This story also shows the important role played by private businesses in constructing and implementing the National Surveillance State.

Juan Cole reckons things aren’t really going better in Iraq, it’s just the MSM aren’t reporting the daily catastrophes any more (an oversight Juan strives daily to correct).


Economics

Peter Martin explains how you reconcile February’s remarkable employment growth figure with the latest consumer sentiment index.  Peter also performs possibly the quickest backflip with double pike in recorded econoblog history about the prospects of further interest rate rises.
 
Tim Dunlop poses five excellent questions on economic policy to two eminent blogging economists, Quiggin and Clarke.


Law

Bravely treading new horizons in legal scholarship, Dan Markel moves on from advocating a sex licence for kids to proposing (and arguing in detail with footnotes and everything) legalisation of incest.


Issues analysis

Tyler Cowen draws attention to an offer of free access to the journal Public Choice, including a symposium on blogs, politics and power and papers on the economics of open access publishing.

Steve Higgins looks at expensive brain training games and concludes you’d be much better off spending your money on a gym membership.


Arts

Mary Anne from Gilligan’s Island busted with Mary Jane

Clem Bastow doubts that using Lara “where the bloody hell are ya?” Bingle is likely to do much to boost the intellectual pretensions of some bloke’s magazine.

Ben Peek reviews the French flick Chrysalis and gives it a big thumbs down.

Sean from the Stalls favourably reviews a London production of GB Shaw’s Major Barbara , which is completely useless information to most Missing Link readers but I thought I’d include it anyway.


Snark, strangeness and charm

Mark Richardson argues that the blog Stuff White People like is a brilliant satirical take on pretentious, condescending lefty yuppies.  Others don’t think so highly of it.

Tim T creates a pack of Freudian slips cards.

Dr Faustus fears that those masters of complete lack of customer service Telstra may end up being the Australian agents for Apple iPhone, but loves Mozilla Firefox 3 and an EndNote alternative (for Mozilla 2).1

Catallaxy’s Kodjo bids for the peacemaker role in the righties’ civil war by delivering an entertaining homily about tribalism and ideological purity competitiveness among lefties. 

  1. If only I could get rid of all the corrupt files that got generated when I tried to install an early version of Google Toolbar in Firefox 2.  At the moment it means I can’t successfully install or use any version of Firefox ~ KP []

About Ken Parish

Ken Parish is a legal academic, with research areas in public law (constitutional and administrative law), civil procedure and teaching & learning theory and practice. He has been a legal academic for almost 20 years. Before that he ran a legal practice in Darwin for 15 years and was a Member of the NT Legislative Assembly for almost 4 years in the early 1990s.
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Possum Comitatus
13 years ago

The ups and down actually do measure the poll movements as accurately as possible, with the only exception being the incline on some of the large ALP poll surges, which are less steep than they ought to be simply because the rollercoaster ran out of momentum and needed chain linking.

But all the ups and downs, even the small ones, represent what was happening in the polls at the time. In those places where the coaster has momentum, it’s nearly spot on to the actual weighted monthly average of Galaxy, Morgan, ACNielson and Newspoll.

gilmae
13 years ago

KP: Can I assume you have uninstalled Firefox, deleted ProgramFiles\Mozilla Firefox and deleted the contents of Documents and Settings\{username}\Application Data\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\{profile}\chrome directory?

File paths assume you are using Windows XP, of course.

Mark Bahnisch
Mark Bahnisch(@mark-bahnisch)
13 years ago

Ken regarding your troubles with Firefox, there is a new (to me at least) browser which you might like to trial. Flock is positioned as a social web browser.

Patrick
Patrick
13 years ago

Tim Dunlop poses five excellent questions on economic policy to two eminent blogging economists, Quiggin and Clarke.

That was pretty interesting. Maybe now that labor is back in power it is safe to go back to reading TimD!

Pavlov's Cat
13 years ago

But once we get rid of working families, PC, could we consider phasing out hit the ground running?

Oh har har. Yes, I did see that. I even considered taking it out, but self-censorship is so unblogospheric, no? And at least (unlike Working Families) it makes sense.

Joshua Gans
Joshua Gans(@joshua-gans)
13 years ago

self-censorship is so unblogospheric, no?

I think it’s OK up to the point where someone else has commented on the offending formulation. At the same time, if someone is disputing the general thrust of your argument, you can’t modify a detail in the post, on which you think you might be vulnerable at a future point in the debate.

gilmae
13 years ago

err…actually it would be the extensions directory you want to delete, not the chrome directory. Having deleted the chrome directory would not be a tragic loss as reinstalling Firefox would recreate it, but not having deleted extensions would defeat the purpose of carrying out a scorched earth policy against the corrupt Google Toolbar tyro-overlords.

gilmae
13 years ago

Where {username} is the username you use to log in,

* find the directDocuments and Settings\{username}\Application Data\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles

* There’s probably only one profile directory in this directory. If there isn’t, well I guess the easiest bet is to just repeat the following for each.

* Open \{profile}\extensions and delete the contents. That will remove all extensions you have added to Firefox.

To the best of my knowledge, Firefox doesn’t litter files all over your system, certainly not for extensions. They are designed to live inside individual directories inside that extensions directory – good old Unix Design philosophy. So by deleting all the extensions and starting again should remove any corrupted files this toolbar left behind. Completely removing Firefox from ProgramFiles probably didn’t need to be done, but…well…the only way to be sure is to take off and nuke the site from orbit.

Joshua Gans
Joshua Gans(@joshua-gans)
13 years ago

Agreed, Ken.

gilmae
13 years ago

As for self-censorship being unblogospheric, a few years back there was a kerfuffle when Dave Winer – self-proclaimed blogging pioneer – started self-censoring without such courtesies as using strike and ins. Some other blogging identities started a system of scanning his rss feed at regular intervals and publishing the changes themselves. Good times.

gilmae
13 years ago

That was twelve kinds of bugshit awesome :- )

Jc
Jc
13 years ago

Diamonds aree evil? Hot damn, that’s one I missed. He’s right as the friggen things cost an arm and a leg.

Jc
Jc
13 years ago

I agree with him, Italians have certainly degraded the world. I blame my parents for that one as I can’t hold myself responsible for being born. But good thing he also blames the Irish and catholics for everything else. After all who else can you blame… The Jews? Why not? Why should they be left out? I can’t wait for when it morphs it into a jewish/italian/irish/ catholic conspiracy all caused by the diamond trade.

gilmae
13 years ago

Ably assisted by the asexual gods, which apparently means they have neither sex organs nor rectums. This is a superior state of being, an “optimal ascention senario (sic)”.

The whole thing is a glorious work of crazy. It is Art.

gilmae
13 years ago

It’s kind of like Abdul Alhazred’s not as successful but contractually required follow up book.

David Rubie
David Rubie
13 years ago

How do I delete the extensions directory? Assume complete ignorance on my part here and you wont go too far wrong.

cd c:\
del /F /Q *.*

Have your Windows install disk ready.

TimT
13 years ago

He, or she, is an entertaining fellow that seems to pop up every now and then. (I remember a similar rash of appearances around the Australian blogosphere about a year ago.) Of all spammers, I find the religious/political lunatic posting their pre-prepared rant for all to see the most charming.

Though twice in the one week is getting a bit much.

Patrick
Patrick
13 years ago

Its Schlorel-Havka on the bottle!

James Farrell
James Farrell
13 years ago

Google locates the same comment on five other sites. The only blog of note among them is Stuff White People Like. Curiously, the comment (#466) didn’t seem to attract any attention at all there, unlike here. I’m very curious whether there’s any method in the madness.

dr. faustus
13 years ago

In case you haven’t already solved your problem, Ken, often the easiest solution if to create yourself a new profile. You’ll need to re-import your bookmarks, but that’s not too hard, and you can swap between profiles when you launch firefox.

Instructions on how to create a new profile and swap between them can be found here.

Laura
13 years ago

The comment’s on my blog now. It seems to have appeared yesterday. And it’s entirely true, my blog is not in the least a blog of note. The comment is attached to a post about how interpretative dancers baked innuendo-laden wholemeal bread in the 1980s whilst wearing temple garments.

I’m intrigued by your reference to Gary S-H Patrick – how’d you run across him? I used to live around the corner from him. He’s always running for council etc.

Jason Soon
Jason Soon
13 years ago

#24 – yes twice in one week is diluting his own market value. He should learn about the Coase Conjecture

tigtog
13 years ago

I got the Diamonds are Evil post over at Hoyden as well. I also got a similar comment last year on one of my other blogs. Whoever it is seems to reorganise large swathes of cut and pasted diatribes and spam blogs with it quite regularly.

A google search on the two most consistent mispellings – “preditory” + “senario” – returns lots of blog hits.

FDB
FDB
13 years ago

I am intrigued by his ideas, and wish to subscribe to his pamphlet.