Film Festivals

It’s a strange thing. Film festivals are great things. Yet in my case I see them come, think “I’d like to go to some of those movies” and an awful lot of the time I don’t manage to make it. We have two sectors – the commercial sector that advertises its little head off and serves up dreck and then festivals, which are full of gems, and if they’re not gems there are lots of interesting movies. But they come and go and the movies never get the time to get word of mouth going about them.  And the main alternative source of information is the festival catalogue – which like most marketing may give you information, but they want you to go, so you can’t trust them when they say what a great movie something is.

Now one can go through their catalogue and their timetable and then high-tail it off to Google or Rotten Tomatoes and read film reviews. But is there a better way? At one stage I talked Paul Martin who wrote a great blog on Melbourne films to post on Troppo.  A couple of posts later came this on his site:

In essence, I am finding my own truth, my core self, and understanding how my life experiences have veiled me to that truth. I realise now how deluded and clouded much of my personality has been, including my writing in this medium. My writing will now have a greater personal integrity and be aligned to the Spiritual content and values of whatever I place here whether it be critiquing a movie or chatting to you about the events of my life as this blogger.

Stay tuned – my mentor says actions will speak louder.

And that was the end of that.

So if someone can rustle up a film critic for Troppo that would be just fine.  And would anyone like to make any recommendations of what films I should see in the coming French Film Festival and explain why?

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via collins
via collins
9 years ago

Hi Nick,

As a film distributor of arty fillums, it breaks my heart just a little to see this post get a rousing zero comments.

Perhaps the wrong demographic?

Either way, a few tips, commencing with our own offerings:

PRESUMED GUILTY – a wrenching drama torn from the Parisian headlines wherein a husband and wife dragged out of their homes in middle of the night for crimes of molestation against minors. Mind you, their children are watching as the cops drag ’em away. The harrowing just does not stop, and the very fine Phillipe Torreton delivers a cracking effort as the father who goes head to head with the French legal system and…..

SKYLAB – Julie Delpy delves into childhood memories of holidays in Brittany, of families yelling and arguing, consuming fine comestibles and yelling some more, but there’s a lovely kid’s perspective also which draws on shared memories from my generation of gawkiness, or wide-eyed wonder. It’s a whole lot of raucous fun. At least, I reckon it is anyway.

THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO – a new one from Rober Guediguian, the first of his Marseilles films that actually leaves Marseilles and heads for Africa. I’ve always enjoyed his cinema, I’ve not seen this, but look forward to it.

FREE MEN –

via collins
via collins
9 years ago

Hi Nick,

As a film distributor of arty fillums, it breaks my heart just a little to see this post get a rousing zero comments.

Perhaps the wrong demographic?

Either way, a few tips, commencing with our own offerings:

PRESUMED GUILTY – a wrenching drama torn from the Parisian headlines wherein a husband and wife dragged out of their homes in middle of the night for crimes of molestation against minors. Mind you, their children are watching as the cops drag ’em away. The harrowing just does not stop, and the very fine Phillipe Torreton delivers a cracking effort as the father who goes head to head with the French legal system and…..

SKYLAB – Julie Delpy delves into childhood memories of holidays in Brittany, of families yelling and arguing, consuming fine comestibles and yelling some more, but there’s a lovely kid’s perspective also which draws on shared memories from my generation of gawkiness, or wide-eyed wonder. It’s a whole lot of raucous fun. At least, I reckon it is anyway.

THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO – a new one from Rober Guediguian, the first of his Marseilles films that actually leaves Marseilles and heads for Africa. I’ve always enjoyed his cinema, I’ve not seen this, but look forward to it.

FREE MEN –

via collins
via collins
9 years ago

bugger.

FREE MEN – fascinating espionage piece focusses on the role played by Mosques in information and smuggling during WW2. Cleverly paced, it features a who’s who of young French Arabic talent in front of the camera led by the estimable Tahar Rahim.

Hope that these help. I’ve seen a few others, but am commenting on those that I personally liked.

Hope you get to some screenings.

cheers.

Stephen Hill
Stephen Hill
9 years ago

I’d second the Robert Guediguian film – haven’t seen the film (SNOW OF KILIMANJARO) – but its a film in the hands of a good director.

THE LAST METRO – Yes one of Francois Trauffaut’s best films. I know that after his early films he did dip into a few dull romantic comedies (some of the later Antoine Doinel series are tedious), but this is Trauffaut covering interesting territory (I guess his new-wave colleague Godard also had a bad patch when his politics started to overwhelm his storytelling.) Guessing you might have already seen it – but it is on closing night if you are interested.

THE CONQUEST – The Sarkosy film. Don’t know much about it, but I’m curious about how well this depicts Nicholas Sarkosy’s rise to power – his conflicts with Chirac, looks like an interesting commentary on how politics and celebrity can overlap.

PATER – sounds interesting too – a sort of fantastical spoof of the pursuit of becoming president of France, with the director injecting his character into the script.

Maybe

ALL OUR DESIRES – its the follow-up film by the director to WELCOME

Sorry I’ve all just got my computer monitor back from the manufacturer.

Also, in Sydney, Brisbane and Canberra there is the 2012 Windows on Europe Film Festival – showcasing films from the European Union – if you are in Canberra it is still running for a few days. You’d be amazed how often I get the programs to these events after they have already happened.

fred
fred
9 years ago

Radio National, one of the sponsors of the Festival, is giving away free double passes to a preview screening of Presumed Guilty. Details are on the ABC website. Tickets available until 24 February or until they run out earlier.

It’s very difficult trying to choose 4 or 5 films out of 45 or so in the program. I try to choose things that probably won’t get a commercial release here

My selection based on online film reviews:

Point Blank – high speed action thriller. The second film from this director whose debut film, Anything for Her, was shown at the 2010 French Film Festival and which spawned a Hollywood remake.

Early One Morning – a bank manager goes to work and shoots two of his bosses.

Nobody Else But You – “There’s a hint of ‘Twin Peaks’ and a large helping of the Coen Bros. in this offbeat, cleverly crafted French thriller about a crime-fiction writer investigating the death of a local TV star who believed she was the reincarnation of Marilyn Monroe”, according to one reviewer.

My wife and daughter-in-law are taking to me to Romantics Anonymous, a romantic comedy about 2 shy chocolate makers who fall in love. Will they use too much saccharine?

After reading the following review, I am not going to see Against the Wind:

Scene follows scene, the actors speak their lines, the technicians are faultless and the headwinds blow in from the sea on cue, but the movie remains grounded, weighed down by a screenplay that is frequently clunky and the overall impression of an exercise in directing-by-numbers. [The supporting actors] make the most of the material they are given, but [Audrey]Tautou is too briefly on screen to provide much uplift

In one of the films shown at the 2010 French Film Festival, one of the characters came out of a movie theatre and said “After the cinema, nothing surprises you. Anything can happen.”

via collins
via collins
9 years ago

I’ve seen “Early One Morning”.

It’s unique, and I think the content might synch nicely for Troppo readers!

Jill
9 years ago

I’ve seen a couple of films at the FFF. I went to the Radio National screening of Presumed guilty – this is interesting in what it is not about – which is the wider story of the Outreau event. The film chooses to concentrate on one of the accused and his story. It’s all filmed from his POV – what happens tgo him is pretty horrible. Worth seeing – but I’d now like a doco about the context for his story. I saw Pater on the weekend – indulgent and boring.

Early One Morning is well worth seeing – focuses on a banker who has a breakdown as a result of ugly organisational dynamics and loss of identity. Very authentic – even in the banality of his workplace.

Elles is also interesting – like the other two films I’ve liked, the main actor has carried the narrative. About being a woman, sex and a little bit about class. About the compromises we all make. Juliette Binoche is great.

fred
fred
9 years ago

Hi Nick
What did you eventually see at the FFF?

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[…] In the spirit of an earlier post addressing the French Film Festival, I’m now repeating my bleg, this time for the German Film Festival. Just to recap, this is an extract of what I said there. […]