Spending more time with the kids

Economic Conditions and Child Abuse
by Jason M. Lindo, Jessamyn Schaller, Benjamin Hansen – #18994 (CH HE LE LS)

Abstract:

Although a huge literature spanning several disciplines documents an
association between poverty and child abuse, researchers have not
found persuasive evidence that economic downturns increase abuse,
despite their impacts on family income. In this paper, we address
this seeming contradiction. Using county-level child abuse data
spanning 1996 to 2009 from the California Department of Justice, we
estimate the extent to which a county’s reported abuse rate diverges
from its trend when its economic conditions diverge from trend,
controlling for statewide annual shocks. The results of this
analysis indicate that overall measures of economic conditions are
not strongly related to rates of abuse. However, focusing on overall
measures of economic conditions masks strong opposing effects of
economic conditions facing males and females: male layoffs increase
rates of abuse whereas female layoffs reduce rates of abuse. These
results are consistent with a theoretical framework that builds on
family-time-use models and emphasizes differential risks of abuse
associated with a child’s time spent with different caregivers.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W18994?utm_campaign=ntw&utm_medium=email&utm_source=ntw

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observa
observa
8 years ago

These results are consistent with a theoretical framework that builds on family-time-use models and emphasizes differential risks of abuse
associated with a child’s time spent with different caregivers.

Scintillating stuff but I was really on the edge of my seat when MrsO received the results of her first TFEL Student feedback for Term 1 2013 with her teacher percentage scores and a nice bar graph. My Gonskis at work thinks I but what exactly is this TFEL stuff? A quick google and I see it’s-

a starting point for an ongoing discussion about pedagogy as core work for all personnel and a basis for promoting a rich and nuanced understanding of pedagogy – for leaders with teachers as well as teachers with students

Hold that thought O meboy but just how did the missus go with that feedback from her students when quizzed by the experts in the field?

Develop Democratic Relationships-82%
Build a community of Learners-81%
Negotiate Learning-66%
Challenge Students to achieve high standards with appropriate support-81%
Teach students how to Learn-84%
Foster deep understanding and skillful action-77%
Explore the construction of knowledge-79%
Promote dialogue as a means of learning-78%
Build on learners understandings-78%
Connect Learning to student lives and aspirations-70%
Apply and assess learning in authentic contexts-66%
Communicate learning in multiple modes-60%

First thing I noticed with TfEL (that’s how the graph was headed) and those categories is the importance of capitals in certain circumstances but not the odd apostrophe it seems.

Nice to know MrsO received her highest score for teaching her kids how to Learn but clearly she’ll have to brush up on communicating learning in multiple modes. Naturally I can’t wait to see if she’s improved on those scores with her Year1 kiddies’ feedback in Term 2. If she doesn’t improve then clearly she’ll need some more courses in nuanced understanding of the pedagogy. Either that or more Gonskis to lift her game.