The darker side of restrictive occupational licencing

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john r walker
john r walker(@annesanders)
7 years ago

Nicholas
What are the countries, or is it states of the US or what?

john r walker
john r walker(@annesanders)
7 years ago
Reply to  Nicholas Gruen

Where did the graph come from?

steve from brisbane
7 years ago

If one looks at the States that line up with VA (Virginia?) on the restrictiveness scale, it indicates to me that something else more important that restrictiveness is going on to determine the rate of lost teeth. (Actually, you can say that about any point on the restrictive scale where there is a wide variance in the missing teeth scale, can’t you? Look at HI and OK, for example. Hawaii and Oklahoma?)

In fact, dare I say it, but it looks like a dubious exercise created by the likes of Cato, but I stand to be corrected.

dahl
dahl
7 years ago

While I agree there has to be more to it, it’s useful to illustrate artificial supply constraint problems.

Other important factors for missing teeth would have to be average age, diet, flouride and date flouridation was provided in the water, among others.

Nevertheless, there would have to be at least a threshold level at which supply constraints (including licensing) become problematic – hence the correlation.

john r walker
john r walker(@annesanders)
7 years ago

Actually the share of adults missing teeth, even for the two highest locations : KY and WV, is only 0.40, and that does not seem that plausible (particularly in poorer locations or places with a lot of people over say 60). Curious as to where this chart comes from?

Mel
Mel
7 years ago

The best performer in that lot is Colorado of “Colorado Brown Stain”, ie teeth mottling fame which is caused by naturally occurring fluoride in Colorado’s drinking water.

The discovery that CBS was associated with better dental health is the reason why government’s started fluoridating water. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_water_fluoridation

I’m disinclined to take that graph seriously although I agree to at least some extent with the point being made.

I’ve personally only visited a dentist three times in the last 20 years. I’d prefer a cheaper if somewhat riskier alternative to these thieving extortionists, so I’m planning on seeing a dentist on my next VN trip.

Tel
Tel
7 years ago
Reply to  Mel

From personal experience (not official qualifications) buy a small container of clove oil (good chemists have it). Woolworths Select offer a nice type of plastic F-shaped thingy, with about 10mm of floss on one end. It’s hard to explain, but they are about 1000 times quicker and easier to use than regular floss, you get the hang of them. Tip a tiny sprinkle of clove oil on the floss. Don’t use much, it’s stupidly strong. Tastes bad, but clove oil is an excellent anti-bacterial and very good for your gums, makes them exceptionally clean.

Top notch dental hygiene in less than 60 seconds a day, and portable.

steve from brisbane
7 years ago
Reply to  Tel

Don’t know about the clove oil, but yes, the Woolies flossing thingees are sensationally better and quicker than using normal floss. (Maybe dentists would not recommend it, but i rinse and re-use each one a few times before throwing out, too.)