Category Archives: Sortition and citizens’ juries

The sound and the fury signifying nothing: some observations on the new politics

Back in the day, (which is to say for most of the 20th century until things began changing in the 1980s, each of the major political parties had a few percentage points of the population as members. In addition to … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Philosophy, Political theory, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 8 Comments

Demarchy 2020: by John Burnheim

Another post from John Burnheim who wrote this following up on having received some questions from some Spaniards. (Reminding me of the title of John Lennon’s book, or perhaps it was just a joke of his somewhere: A Spaniard in … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 1 Comment

From Trump to eternity: The fate of the political arts in the modern world

Published in and edited form in The Conversation. Martin Wolf has a crisp face-to-camera opinion piece in which he points out that populism in government hasn’t lined up neatly against relative success in keeping populations safe from COVID. Thus in … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Political theory, Politics - international, Politics - national, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 11 Comments

Knowing your arse from your Albo: how political parties might access the ‘blind break’ to get better leaders

A lottery is a defensible way of making a decision when, and to the extent that, it is important that bad reasons be kept out of the decision.  Peter Stone Left of centre parties have been serving up seriously, obviously … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 2 Comments

The competition delusion: the presentation

Early this year I published an essay in the Griffith Review critiquing what I called the competition delusion. I was passing by more common critiques of competition, which for instance argue that competition isn’t necessarily a great idea in numerous … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Economics and public policy, Education, Ethics, History, Philosophy, Political theory, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 8 Comments

The Road to Political Reform Based on Sortition: Guest Post by John Burnheim

Scrap attempts to reforming politics as a whole. From a practical point of view attempts to do so by legal constitutional change have no possibility of succeeding from a theoretical point of view, it is folly to assume that if … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Philosophy, Political theory, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 1 Comment

What things shouldn’t we be wasting this crisis on?

The subject of this post has been a theme of some conversations I’ve had with some people in Canberra. What things should we have been doing before the crisis that the crisis concentrates the mind sufficiently to try to do … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Economics and public policy, regulation, Sortition and citizens’ juries | 6 Comments