Author Archives: Richard Tsukamasa Green

About Richard Tsukamasa Green

Richard Tsukamasa Green is an economist. Public employment means he can't post on policy much anymore. Also found at @RHTGreen on twitter.

Is the world better off with a Bigger Australia, or with more Australians?

Michael Fullilove, of the Lowy Institute, last week gave a speech espousing the established (non-radical) centrist view that more immigration to Australia is highly desirable – that migration is an essential step to A Bigger Australia. I like immigration. In fact, … Continue reading

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Sakura Tsukamasa-Green: 2013-2013

One year ago our daughter died and was born. We called her Sakura, for the cherry blossom. Sakura is a thing of beauty that does not, and cannot last, longer than a short time. But we meet its brief time … Continue reading

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There are none so soft minded as those that think themselves hard headed

AKA “Intellectual vanity and policy poseurs” AKA “Contorting sophistry in favour of contractionary monetary policy” AKA “The global Serious id hrumphs again”. Part 3 of a series (1, 2). Via Matt Cowgill I see weak corporate governance beneficiary [1] Richard Goyder … Continue reading

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Election Interloper 2013

The Lowy Interpreter is running a series where their experts explain, in (theoretically) 100 words or less, what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. I’m intrigued enough to think that the thoughts of a … Continue reading

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Department of brain farts: Transferable postal addresses

Here’s a simple problem. Due to tradition, law and custom about the way we deal with debt and contracts and the like, a great deal of human activity requires the transport of pieces of paper from person to person. The … Continue reading

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Department of self indulgence

This is just some expanded and consolidated musing from Twitter. A few days ago I was thinking about The Fall of Icarus, the 16th century Dutch painting after Bruegel.

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Before you ask “what does it mean?”, ask “does it mean anything?”

This year, and the last, the lovely Lowy Institute Poll has produced a headline grabbing finding that Australians, and particularly young Australians, are ambivalent about democracy. The search for meaning was on. This year it was attributed, in part, to a … Continue reading

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